Research: importance of EQ

Please see our extensive list of studies below

Huge costs of mental disorders can be avoided

In the EU, about 165 million people are affected each year by mental disorders, mostly anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders 12. Overall, more than 50% of the general population in middle‐ and high‐income countries will suffer from at least one mental disorder at some point in their lives. Mental disorders are therefore by no means limited to a small group of predisposed individuals but are a major public health problem with marked consequences for society. They are related to severe distress and functional impairment—these features are in fact mandatory diagnostic criteria—that can have dramatic consequences not only for those affected but also for their families and their social‐ and work‐related environments 3.

 

… Moreover, owing to demographic changes and longer life expectancy, the long‐term burden of mental disorders is even expected to increase 3.

 

In 2010, mental and substance use disorders constituted 10.4% of the global burden of disease and were the leading cause of years lived with disability among all disease groups.

 

These consequences are not limited to patients and their social environment—they affect the entire social fabric, particularly through economic costs.

 

Mental disorders therefore account for more economic costs than chronic somatic diseases such as cancer or diabetes…

 

… the treatment gap for mental and substance use disorders is higher than for any other health sector

Based on data from 2010, the global direct and indirect economic costs of mental disorders were estimated at US$2.5 trillion. Importantly, the indirect costs (US$1.7 trillion) are much higher than the direct costs (US$0.8 trillion), which contrasts with other key disease groups, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For the EU, a region with highly developed healthcare systems, the direct and indirect costs were estimated at €798 billion 7. Both direct and indirect costs of mental disorders are expected to double by 2030 (Fig 2A). It should be noted that these calculations did not include costs associated with mental disorders from outside the healthcare system, such as legal costs caused by illicit drug abuse.

 

Between 2011 and 2030, the cumulative economic output loss associated with mental disorders is thereby projected to US$ 16.3 trillion worldwide, making the economic output loss related to mental disorders comparable to that of cardiovascular diseases, and higher than that of cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes (Fig 2B).

Date: 2016

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5007565/

 

 

Ecology and green consumption

 

What’s the connection between emotional intelligence and behaviour change, in the context of sustainability.

Joshua Freedman: Daniel Goleman wrote a new book called, “Ecological Intelligence” where he talks about that. I’ve done a couple of interviews with Dan where we discuss this. Our work in emotional intelligence is largely about how people make better decisions and take action in a way that’s aligned with what they really want to happen. As we think about our long term goals, how do we take actions in a way that moves us towards those long term goals?  The whole point of intelligence is to look ahead and solve problems – mathematical intelligence helps us solve numerical problems; emotional intelligence helps us solve human problems.

 

In other words, if we’re using EQ to make optimal long-term decisions, we have to also be thinking about the ecosystem in which we will either suffer, or flourish. Being intentional in an ecological sense means creating a more sustainable world starts with decisions and choices we make individually, actions we take individually.  Tapping the power of EQ means recognising that emotions are major drivers of those behaviours – whether that behaviour is consuming resources for short term profit, or conserving them, or whether that behaviour is advocating for a vibrant future.

https://www.6seconds.org/2012/02/14/emotional-intelligence-sustainable-business/

 

Yet they also erected a series of psychological barriers to justify why they should not act either individually or through collective institutions to mitigate climate change. From the viewpoint of changing their lifestyles of material comfort and high-energy dependence, they regarded the consequences of possible behavioural shift arising from the need to meet mitigation measures as more daunting. To overcome the dissonance created in their minds they created a number of socio-psychological denial mechanisms. Such mechanisms heightened the costs of shifting away from comfortable lifestyles, set blame on the inaction of others, including governments, and emphasised doubts regarding the immediacy of personal action when the e!ects of climate change seemed uncertain and far away. These “ndings suggest that more attention needs to be given to the social and psychological motivations as to why individuals erect barriers to their personal commitment to climate change mitigation, even when professing anxiety over climate futures

Date: 2000

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Susanne_Stoll-Kleemann/publication/222661053_The_psychology_of_denial_concerning_climate_mitigation_measures_Evidence_from_Swiss_focus_groups/links/59e46fa6458515393d60e531/The-psychology-of-denial-concerning-climate-mitigation-measures-Evidence-from-Swiss-focus-groups.pdf

 

Mindfulness: Its Transformative Potential for Consumer, Societal, and Environmental Well-Being

Date: 2016

Source: http://journals.ama.org/doi/abs/10.1509/jppm.15.139?code=amma-site

 

Reappraisal. Reframing the meaning of stimuli that led to an emotional response, i.e., reappraisal, has consistently emerged as a superior strategy for dissipating the emotional response (Gross 2002). Reappraisal includes such behaviors as reminding oneself “it’s just a test” after receiving a poor exam grade, adopting the mindset of a nurse or medical professional to minimize the emotional impact of viewing someone’s injury, or viewing a job layoff as an opportunity to pursue long-forgotten dreams (Gross 1998, Gross 2002). In contrast to suppression, reappraisal not only reduces self-reported negative feelings in response to negative events but also mitigates physiological and neural responses to those events (Jamieson et al 2012, Ochsner et al 2002). Those who employ strategic reappraisal typically have more positive emotional experiences (Gross & John 2003) and show fewer incidences of psychopathology (Aldao et al 2010).

As yet, we find few studies applying reappraisal techniques to emotion effects on JDM, but one path-breaking paper suggests that this area holds promise. Halperin and colleagues (2012) examined the responses of Israelis to the recent Palestinian bid for United Nations recognition. Participants who were randomly assigned to a reappraisal training condition (compared to a control condition) showed greater support for conciliatory policies and less support for aggressive policies toward Palestinians at planned assessments both 1 week and 5 months later.

These results suggest the unusual possibility that inducing an incidental emotion (in this case, gratitude) may reduce an existing bias. Akin to (Loewenstein et al 2012), one might use one bias to counteract another.

Increasing awareness of misattribution. Based on the idea that emotion-related appraisals are automatic (Ekman 1992, Lazarus 1991, LeDoux 1996), the “cognitive-awareness hypothesis” (Han et al 2007) posits that appraisal tendencies will be deactivated when decision makers become more cognitively aware of their decision-making process. Schwarz and Clore (1983) pioneered this approach, discovering in a seminal study that ambient weather effects on judgments of subjective well-being disappeared when people were reminded of the weather. In a similar vein, Lerner and colleagues (1998) showed that inducing decision makers to monitor their judgment processes in a preemptively self-critical way, via the expectation that they would need to justify their decisions to an expert audience (i.e., accountability), reduced the impact of incidental anger on punishment decisions by leading people to focus on judgment-relevant information and dismiss incidental affect as irrelevant to the judgment. Notably, the accountable decision makers did not feel any less anger than the non-accountable decision makers; they simply used better judgment cues

Choice architecture. All the strategies discussed so far are effortful and therefore unlikely to be broadly successful tactics for helping busy decision makers. By contrast, the burgeoning literature on choice architecture offers an alternative set of tactics that affects behaviors automatically without restricting choices (Thaler & Sunstein 2008). It does this by changing the Emotions and Decision Making, p. 29 framing and structure of choices and environments in a way that relies on JDM’s understanding of people’s sometimes faulty decision processes to counteract more pernicious errors. For example, Thaler and Sunstein (2003) suggest that cafeterias should be organized so that the first foods consumers encounter are healthier options, thus increasing the chance that the combination of visceral hunger and mindless consumption does not derail their health goals.

Source: https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/jenniferlerner/files/annual_review_manuscript_june_16_final.final_.pdf

Date: 2014

 

 

Prosocial behaviors

A sample of 1557 students from Spain (53% male, M age = 13.12) completed self-report instruments of coping, empathy, emotional instability, physical aggression, and prosocial behaviors

“Emotional instability positively predicted emotion-focused coping, which in turn, positively predicted aggression. In contrast, empathy positively predicted problem-focused coping, which in turn, positively predicted prosocial behaviors. Moreover, problem-focused coping positively predicted trait empathy, which in turn positively predicted prosocial behaviors, and negatively predicted aggression. Emotion-focused coping was positively related to emotional instability, which in turn, was positively related to aggression.

 

(PDF) The interplay of emotional instability, empathy, and coping on prosocial and aggressive behaviors. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257045571_The_interplay_of_emotional_instability_empathy_and_coping_on_prosocial_and_aggressive_behaviors [accessed Sep 19 2018].”

 

Date: 2012

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257045571_The_interplay_of_emotional_instability_empathy_and_coping_on_prosocial_and_aggressive_behaviors

 

 

“Results showed that both PD” (vicarious experience of personal distress) “and EC” (empathic concern) “were positively related to maladaptive strategies and negatively related to adaptive strategies, and that the association between maladaptive regulation strategies (i.e., rumination) and the willingness to avoid the person in distress was mediated by reports of greater PD. This study thus expands previous evidence on the relationship between maladaptive regulation strategies and affective empathy and provides novel insights into the main role that PD plays in the association between maladaptive strategies and social avoidance.”

 

Date: 2018

 

Source: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0194248

 

Te research more but a good start:

Moreover, experiments suggest that people who are better at identifying fearful facial expressions are also more kind and generous towards others (Marsh et al 2007).

Source: http://www.parentingscience.com/facial-expressions-for-kids.html

 

 

We show nature movies and images and research suggest this will promote cooperative and environmentally sustainable behavior

Participants exposed to nature videos responded more cooperatively on a measure of social value orientation and indicated greater willingness to engage in environmentally sustainable behaviors. Collectively, results suggest that exposure to nature may increase cooperation, and, when considering environmental problems as social dilemmas, sustainable intentions and behavior.

Date: 2015

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272494415000195

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271518597_Cooperation_is_in_our_nature_Nature_exposure_may_promote_cooperative_and_environmentally_sustainable_behavior

Source: http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2015-25743-004

 

SEL Impact is Long-Term and Global

Social and emotional learning (SEL) programs, which previously have shown immediate improvements in mental health, social skills, and academic achievement, continue to benefit students for months and even years to come, according to a 2017 meta-analysis from CASEL, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Loyola University, and the University of British Columbia.

Up to 18 years later, students exposed to SEL in school continue to do better than their peers on a number of indicators: positive social behaviors and attitudes, skills such as empathy and teamwork, and academics. And they have fewer conduct problems, less emotional distress, and lower drug use, among many other benefits. The analysis looked at 82 research studies involving about 100,000 students here and abroad.

Date: 2017

Source: https://casel.org/impact/

Source: https://casel.org/2017-meta-analysis/

 

SEL Impact on Academic Outcomes

According to a 2011 meta-analysis of 213 studies involving more than 270,000 students, those who participated in evidence-based SEL programs showed an 11 percentile-point gain in academic achievement compared to students who did not participate in SEL programs. Compared to students who did not participate in SEL programs, students participating in SEL programs also showed improved classroom behavior, an increased ability to manage stress and depression, and better attitudes about themselves, others, and school.

Date: 2011

Source: https://casel.org/impact/

Source: https://casel.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/meta-analysis-child-development-1.pdf

 

SEL Impact on Equity and Poverty

According to a 2015 report by the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution, SEL competencies are critically important for the long-term success of all students in today’s economy. This report was developed by a group of bipartisan experts who agreed to set aside their differences and create a detailed plan for reducing poverty and increasing economic mobility.

Date: 2015

Source: https://casel.org/impact/

Source: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2015/12/aei-brookings-poverty-report/full-report.pdf

SEL Impact on Lifetime Outcomes

A 2015 national study published in the American Journal of Public Health found statistically significant associations between SEL skills in kindergarten and key outcomes for young adults years later in education, employment, criminal activity, substance use, and mental health.

The study concluded that early prosocial skills decreased the likelihood of living in or being on a waiting list for public housing, receiving public assistance, having any involvement with police before adulthood, and ever spending time in a detention facility.

Date: 2015

Source: https://casel.org/impact/

Source: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302630

 

SEL Benefit-Cost Analysis

A 2015 study by researchers at Columbia University found that the measurable benefits of SEL exceed the costs, often by considerable amounts.

The aggregate result of the analysis showed an average benefit-cost ratio of about 11 to 1 among the six evidence-based SEL interventions studied. This means that, on average, for every $1 invested in SEL programming, there is a return of $11.

Date: 2015

Source: https://casel.org/impact/

Source: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/rulesforengagement/SEL-Revised.pdf

 

Altruism, Helping, or Civic virtues

Altruism, Helping, or Civic virtues. These behaviors tend to occur in individuals with high emotional intelligence scores, unrelated to their quality of working life.

Date: 2016

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276203230_Understanding_The_Mediating_Role_of_Quality_of_Work_Life_on_the_Relationship_between_Emotional_Intelligence_and_Organizational_Citizenship_Behaviors

 

Employment rate

Analyzing unemployment data from two nationally representative British cohorts (N = 16,780), we found that low self-control in childhood was associated with the emergence and persistence of unemployment across four decades. On average, a 1-SD increase in self-control was associated with a reduction in the probability of unemployment of 1.4 percentage points after adjustment for intelligence, social class, and gender. From labor-market entry to middle age, individuals with low self-control experienced 1.6 times as many months of unemployment as those with high self-control.

Date: 2015

Source: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0956797615569001

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/274965126_Childhood_Self-Control_and_Unemployment_Throughout_the_Life_Span_Evidence_From_Two_British_Cohort_Studies

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25870404

 

Diet and weight

Catastrophizing and anxiety sensitivity mediate the relationship between persistent pain and emotional eating

 

Findings suggest pain may be associated with increased likelihood for emotional eating and that characteristics from FAM, in particular anxiety sensitivity and catastrophizing, may mediate the relationship between the presence of persistent pain and emotional eating behavior. Evidence-based treatments targeting anxiety sensitivity and catastrophizing could be useful to address emotional eating in individuals struggling with both weight and chronic pain.

Date: 2016

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019566631630109X

 

Themes from a mental well-being framework were subsequently categorized under five environmental levels of the Social-Ecological Model (SEM). Key mental well-being themes appeared across all levels of the SEM, except the policy level. For the individual environment, one main theme was food as a coping mechanism and source of emotional distress. In the interpersonal environment, two themes were (a) blame and shame by family members and friends because of their weight and (b) condemnation and lack of support from health professionals. In the organizational environment, one main theme was inadequate support for mental well-being issues in obesity management programmes. In the community environment, one major theme the negative mental well-being impact of the social stigma of obesity. An overarching theme of weight stigma and bias further shaped the predominant themes in each level of the SEM. Addressing weight stigma and bias, and promoting positive mental well-being are two important areas of focus for supportive management of individuals living with obesity.

Date: 2015

Source: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17482631.2017.1306421

 

Sport performance and positive attitudes toward physical activity

In the context of sport performance, we found that EI relates to emotions, physiological stress responses, successful psychological skill usage, and more successful athletic performance. In the context of physical activity, we found that trait EI relates to physical activity levels and positive attitudes toward physical activity

Date: 2015

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/sms.12510

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26104015

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/277718197_Emotional_intelligence_in_sport_and_exercise_A_systematic_review

 

Better salary

We find that emotional intelligence has a significant, positive effect on subsequent salary levels, and that this effect is: 1) mediated by having a mentor and 2) stronger at higher organizational levels than at lower levels. Our results suggest that emotional intelligence helps individuals to acquire the social capital needed to be successful in their careers. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Date: 2017

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0001879117300416

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316816644_A_time-lagged_study_of_emotional_intelligence_and_salary

 

Employee Performance

As a result, it has been determined that there is a meaningful relationship among emotional intelligence, innovative institution culture and the performance of the employees. Thus, it can be stated that it is necessary for a company to create an innovative institution culture and to have managers who have high level of emotional intelligence in order to increase the employees’ performance at work.

Date: 2015

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042815057146

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/286541389_The_Relationship_Between_Emotional_Intelligence_of_Managers_Innovative_Corporate_Culture_and_Employee_Performance

 

Earnings, less criminal activity, health and Psychopathology

It is possible that increases in social skills are a key mechanism for long-run impacts of early childhood interventions. Heckman, Pinto, and Savelyev (2013) find that the long-run impacts of the Perry Preschool project on employment, earnings and criminal activity were mediated primarily by program-induced increases in social skills. The Perry Preschool curriculum placed special emphasis on developing children’s skills in cooperation, resolution of interpersonal conflicts, and self-control. Recent longitudinal studies have found strong correlations between a measure of socioemotional skills in kindergarten and important young adult outcomes such as employment, earnings, health, and criminal activity (Dodge et al. 2014; Jones, Greenberg, and Crowley 2015).

Sources:

Heckman James, Pinto Rodrigo, Savelyev Peter, “Understanding the Mechanisms through Which an Influential Early Childhood Program Boosted Adult Outcomes,” American Economic Review , 103 (2013),

Dodge Kenneth A., Bierman Karen L., Coie John D., Greenberg Mark T., Lochman John E., McMahon Robert J., Pinderhughes Ellen E., “Impact of Early Intervention on Psychopathology, Crime, and Well-Being at Age 25,” American Journal of Psychiatry , 172 (2014), 59–70.

Jones Damon E., Greenberg Mark, Crowley Max, “Early Social-Emotional Functioning and Public Health: the Relationship between Kindergarten Social Competence and Future Wellness,” American Journal of Public Health , 105 (2015), e1–e8.

Date: 2017

Source: https://academic.oup.com/qje/article/132/4/1593/3861633

Source: Pages 1593–1640, https://doi.org/10.1093/qje/qjx022

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322028822_The_Growing_Importance_of_Social_Skills_in_the_Labor_Market

 

Project success, job satisfaction, and trust

Based on data collected from 373 project managers in the Australian defence industry, our results indicate that EI has a positive impact on project success, job satisfaction, and trust. Moreover, we found evidence that job satisfaction and trust mediate the relationship between EI and project success. Our findings suggest that top management should be aware of the importance of project managers’ job satisfaction and trust, which can both serve to boost project success in complex project situations.

Date: 2016

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0263786316300291

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303821252_Manager_Emotional_Intelligence_and_Project_Success_The_Mediating_Role_of_Job_Satisfaction_and_Trust

 

Success at work and in organizations

In concluding, we stress the interconnectedness of emotions and emotional regulation across the five levels of the model, arguing that emotions and emotional regulation at each level can influence effects at other levels, ultimately culminating in the organization’s affective climate.

Date: 2017

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318693476_Emotions_and_Emotional_Regulation_in_HRM_A_Multi-Level_Perspective

 

 

Education, employment, criminal activity, substance use, and mental health

RESULTS:

We found statistically significant associations between measured social-emotional skills in kindergarten and key young adult outcomes across multiple domains of education, employment, criminal activity, substance use, and mental health.

CONCLUSIONS:

A kindergarten measure of social-emotional skills may be useful for assessing whether children are at risk for deficits in noncognitive skills later in life and, thus, help identify those in need of early intervention. These results demonstrate the relevance of noncognitive skills in development for personal and public health outcomes.

Date: 2015

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26180975

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280115656_Early_Social-Emotional_Functioning_and_Public_Health_The_Relationship_Between_Kindergarten_Social_Competence_and_Future_Wellness

 

Health

Research – 343 Australian adults, aged between 18 and 77 years

Emotional intelligence partially mediated the relationship between anxious insecurity and health outcomes. However, emotional intelligence fully mediated the relationship between avoidant insecurity and health outcomes. Results support a model in which insecure attachment is associated with deficits in emotional intelligence, which in turn is related to poorer health outcomes. We explore different mechanisms through which the two types of insecure attachment may impact on health.

Date: 2014

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886916301830

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/301594777_Emotional_intelligence_mediates_the_relationship_between_insecure_attachment_and_subjective_health_outcomes

 

Creativity – one of the most important ability for future jobs, according to latest research

Specifically, we propose that emotion regulation ability enables employees to maintain higher positive affect (PA) when faced with unique knowledge processing requirements, while emotion facilitation ability enables employees to use their PA to enhance their creativity. We find support for our hypotheses using a multimethod (ability test, experience sampling, survey) and multisource (archival, self-reported, supervisor-reported) research design of early career managers across a wide range of jobs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Date: 2014

Source: http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2014-56222-001

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25528247

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/269876466_Regulating_and_Facilitating_The_Role_of_Emotional_Intelligence_in_Maintaining_and_Using_Positive_Affect_for_Creativity

 

The results of structural equation modeling (SEM) indicate a sequential mediation model where emotionally intelligent employees display a high level of generosity; these acts of generosity nurture a sense of vigor, which in turn fosters creative behaviors.

Date: 2013

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jocb.53

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259539401_Emotional_Intelligence_and_Creativity_The_Mediating_Role_of_Generosity_and_Vigor

 

The first and foremost benefit of trait EI training is enhanced mental well-being: EI training leads both to a drop in psychological problems (e.g., burnout and distress) as well as to an increase in happiness, life satisfaction, and quality of life (Nelis et al., 2011; Vesely, Saklofske, & Nordstokke, 2014). The second benefit is an improvement in self-reported physical health, which is also reflected in biological changes, such as a 14% drop in diurnal cortisol secretion in Kotsou et al.’s (2011) study and a 9.7% drop in glycated hemoglobin in Karahan and Yalcin’s (2009) study. The third documented benefit is improved quality of marital and social relationships (Kotsou et al., 2011), with a strong agreement between participant and spouse (or friend) reports.

Date: 2016

Source: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1754073916650493#_i12

 

Physical aggression

Results from both studies suggest a negative and significant relationship between AEI and physical aggression

Date: 2016

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/sjop.12331

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308722873_Ability_emotional_intelligence_and_its_relation_to_aggression_across_time_and_age_groups

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27678490

 

Please find more research, tools and information here https://casel.org/resources/

Psychopathy

Highlights

  • Meta-analysisexamining the relationship of emotional intelligence with psychopathy.
  • Psychopathy is associated with emotional deficits.
  • Higher psychopathic trait scores are related to lower emotional intelligence levels.
  • EI factors must be integrated in traditional models of psychopathy.
  • Important implications for the prevention, evaluation, and treatment of psychopathy.

 

A quantitative and systematic review of the literature using Scopus, Medline, Pubmed, and PsicINFO showed a total of 13 studies meeting inclusion criteria with a combined sample of 2401 participants. The meta-analysis revealed a significant negative relationship between both constructs, showing that higher psychopathic trait scores are related to lower EI levels. We propose several future research lines to clarify possible gaps and ambiguities in the current literature and a set of interesting clinical implications for the prevention, evaluation, and treatment of psychopathic traits by including EI factors in traditional models of psychopathy.

 

Date: 2017

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29217464

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321629372_The_relationship_between_trait_psychopathy_and_emotional_intelligence_A_meta-analytic_review

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763417305146

 

 

EI can be trained starting a young age and up to adulthood and is effective on the short and long term

 

An extensive body of rigorous research (including randomized control trials, longitudinal follow-ups, and multiple replications) demonstrates that education that promotes social and emotional learning (SEL) gets results, and that teachers in all academic areas can effectively teach SEL.

Source: https://casel.org/impact/

 

This is the big news contained in a recently completed meta-analysis of 668 evaluation studies of SEL programs for children from preschoolers through high school. The massive survey was conducted by Roger Weissberg, who directs the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning at the University of Illinois at Chicago – the organization that has led the way in bringing SEL into schools worldwide.

The data show that SEL programs yielded a strong benefit in academic accomplishment, as demonstrated in achievement test results and grade-point averages. In participating schools, up to 50 percent of children showed improved achievement scores and up to 38 percent improved their grade-point averages. SEL programs also made schools safer: incidents of misbehavior dropped by an average of 28 percent; suspensions by 44 percent; and other disciplinary actions by 27 percent. At the same time, attendance rates rose, while 63 percent of students demonstrated significantly more positive behavior. In the world of social science research, these remarkable results for any program promoting behavioral change, SEL had delivered on its promise.

Source: http://www.danielgoleman.info/topics/emotional-intelligence/

 

Disadvantaged children

A growing literature establishes that high quality early childhood interventions targeted toward disadvantaged children have substan-tial impacts on later life outcomes. (1) Understanding the Mechanisms Through Which an Influential Early Childhood Program Boosted Adult Outcomes

The measured adult outcomes are:

  • # of misdemeanor arrests, age 27 (-)
  • # of felony arrests, age 27 (-)
  • # of adult arrests (misd.+fel.), age 27 (-)
  • Monthly income, age 27 (+)
  • Use tobacco, age 27 (-)
  • # of misdemeanor arrests, age 40 (-)
  • # of felony arrests, age 40 (-)
  • # of adult arrests (misd.+fel.), age 40 (-)
  • # of lifetime arrests, age 40 (-)
  • Employed, age 40 (+)
  • Use heroin, age 40 (-)
  • Any special education, age 14 (-)
  • Mentally impaired at least once, age 19 (+)
  • Jobless for more than 1 year, age 27 (-)
  • Ever tried drugs other than alcohol or weed, age 27 (-)
  • # of misdemeanor violent crimes, age 40 (-)
  • # of felony arrests, age 40 (-)
  • # of lifetime violent crimes, age 40 (-)
  • Months in all marriages, age 40 (+)
  • Ever on welfare, age

Date: 2012

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237044956_Understanding_the_Mechanisms_Through_Which_an_Influential_Early_Childhood_Program_Boosted_Adult_Outcomes

 

Intent-to-treat logistic regression analyses indicated that 69% of participants in the control arm displayed at least one externalizing, internalizing, or substance abuse psychiatric problem (based on self- or peer interview) at age 25, in contrast with 59% of those assigned to intervention (odds ratio=0.59, CI=0.43–0.81; number needed to treat=8).

Date: 2015

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4485380/

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/279032850_Impact_of_Early_Intervention_on_Psychopathology_Crime_and_Well-Being_at_Age_25

 

 

… social—emotional intervention programs used in schools have succeeded in improving children’s emotional skills. Implications for practitioners are discussed.

Date: 2011

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258193465_Parenting_Styles_and_Children’s_Emotional_Intelligence_What_do_We_Know

 

 

Efficacity for adults:

The results revealed a significant moderate standardized mean change between pre- and post-measurement for the main effect of EI training, and a stable pre- to follow-up effect. Additionally, the type of EI model, dimensions of the four branch model, length, and type of publication turned out to be significant moderators. The results suggest that EI trainings should be considered effective interventions.

Date: 2017

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316915882_How_Efficient_Are_Emotional_Intelligence_Trainings_A_Meta-Analysis

 

In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis make both theoretical and practical contributions to the EI literature by identifying the extent to which EI can be trained. The moderate and positive effect of training on EI supports the malleability of this construct, allowing us to infer that EI is trainable. These findings should be beneficial to practitioners curious to know whether implementing workplace EI training programs is indeed a good investment. Based on the findings of this meta-analysis of the effect of training on emotional intelligence, we can conclude: Yes, you can train that.

Date: 2018

Source: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kurt_Kraiger/publication/324499568_Can_emotional_intelligence_be_trained_A_meta-analytical_investigation/links/5b0db8f94585157f87222a96/Can-emotional-intelligence-be-trained-A-meta-analytical-investigation.pdf

 

It appears that trait EI is amenable to change, and that this change may lead to concomitant improvements in some of its correlates (thereby suggesting that trait EI is causally linked to these correlates). These changes are evident after a few weeks of training and are maintained for at least 1 year subsequently (Kotsou, Nelis, Gregoire, & Mikolajczak, 2011).

Date: 2016

Source: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1754073916650493#_i12